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Norman Peterson 's Entries

3 blogs
  • 30 Mar 2017
    Colombus - OH March 30, 2017 As a long time hockey player to include organized hockey as a youth and pick up hockey and a beer league guy, I know first hand about drunk hockey players. I have always been at a loss as to why any hockey player would want to play drunk, it's a hard enough game to play when sober as a rock never mind wasted. I am sure I speak for most when I say it's an absolute buzz kill for the sober players who would like to participate in a good skate. Besides the beer tastes better after a good skate anyway. In all seriousness, playing hockey drunk is not only a buzzkill for the sober players but it's a health hazard as well. One needs only imagine the damage that could be done on an ice rink during play if a drunk player does something stupid or crazy or out of his control because they are beer stoned. It places everyone on the ice including the officials in danger and demonstrates a complete lack of respect for others and the game. If you want to play drunk on a lake, or in your backyard in you're own private spaces go ahead, but keep us sober players out of it. I for one believe that playing hockey under the influence at a public facility should be a felony. The fact is it is dangerous and irresponsible and nobody else should be made to pay a heavy price because you want to be a moron.    
    59 Posted by Norman Peterson
  • Colombus - OH March 30, 2017 As a long time hockey player to include organized hockey as a youth and pick up hockey and a beer league guy, I know first hand about drunk hockey players. I have always been at a loss as to why any hockey player would want to play drunk, it's a hard enough game to play when sober as a rock never mind wasted. I am sure I speak for most when I say it's an absolute buzz kill for the sober players who would like to participate in a good skate. Besides the beer tastes better after a good skate anyway. In all seriousness, playing hockey drunk is not only a buzzkill for the sober players but it's a health hazard as well. One needs only imagine the damage that could be done on an ice rink during play if a drunk player does something stupid or crazy or out of his control because they are beer stoned. It places everyone on the ice including the officials in danger and demonstrates a complete lack of respect for others and the game. If you want to play drunk on a lake, or in your backyard in you're own private spaces go ahead, but keep us sober players out of it. I for one believe that playing hockey under the influence at a public facility should be a felony. The fact is it is dangerous and irresponsible and nobody else should be made to pay a heavy price because you want to be a moron.    
    Mar 30, 2017 59
  • 25 Mar 2017
    Description The rotator cuff is the group of four muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint, providing strength and stability. Above the rotator cuff there is a bursa, or sac of tissue, that co-vers and protects the rotator cuff as it comes into close contact with bones around the shoulder (Figure 1). When the rotator cuff is injured or damaged, it can lead to inflammation of the bursa, called bursitis, which causes pain and loss of motion. Causes While some rotator cuff injuries occur as a result of an accident, most result from aging and dete-rioration of the cuff. Rotator cuff tears increase in incidence with age. Signs & Symptoms Damage to the rotator cuff can vary from microscopic tears to large irreparable tears. Symptoms can include: Pain Weakness Restricted motion Catching Locking Feeling of instability The symptoms are usually worse in certain positions, such as reaching backward to fasten a seat belt or pick up a briefcase out of the back seat. Symptoms can also be worse when the arm is ele-vated overhead, especially if there is weight on the arm, such as when picking up a stack of plates out of a cupboard. Overhead activities like pitching, throwing, playing tennis or playing racquet-ball commonly worsen symptoms. But not all rotator cuff tears are painful, and many individuals with rotator cuff injuries have no symptoms. How are rotator cuff injuries diagnosed? The diagnosis can come from: History and physical examination: This is the best way to initially evaluate. It is im-portant for the doctor to identify pain that may be coming from places other than the shoulder, such as the neck or even the heart. X-rays: Although plain x-rays do not show the rotator cuff muscles, they are helpful to look for calcifications, arthritis or bone problems that can cause rotator cuff tears. MRI: This is the most common imaging method to diagnose rotator cuff tears (Figure 2). It can be used to look for tears or inflammation of tissues and to help determine the size and character of the tear to recommend proper treatment. Injections or arthroscopy may also be used to help diagnose rotator cuff tears. Treatment Common treatment options may include: Alterations in activities: Learning to use the shoulder in a safer, more comfortable man-ner is important. Physical therapy: This may help improve mobility and strengthen shoulder muscles. Anti-inflammatory medications and injections: These are used for pain relief and to de-crease inflammation. If these treatments fail, surgical intervention (Figure 3) such as arthroscopy is a reasonable option. Large tears may require joint replacement surgery. Rehabilitation Postoperative treatment depends on which surgical procedure was chosen, but therapy is a critical part of the recovery. Therapy can last from three to 12 months. A coordinated effort between the patient, surgeon and physical or occupational therapist is required  
    48 Posted by Norman Peterson
  • Description The rotator cuff is the group of four muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint, providing strength and stability. Above the rotator cuff there is a bursa, or sac of tissue, that co-vers and protects the rotator cuff as it comes into close contact with bones around the shoulder (Figure 1). When the rotator cuff is injured or damaged, it can lead to inflammation of the bursa, called bursitis, which causes pain and loss of motion. Causes While some rotator cuff injuries occur as a result of an accident, most result from aging and dete-rioration of the cuff. Rotator cuff tears increase in incidence with age. Signs & Symptoms Damage to the rotator cuff can vary from microscopic tears to large irreparable tears. Symptoms can include: Pain Weakness Restricted motion Catching Locking Feeling of instability The symptoms are usually worse in certain positions, such as reaching backward to fasten a seat belt or pick up a briefcase out of the back seat. Symptoms can also be worse when the arm is ele-vated overhead, especially if there is weight on the arm, such as when picking up a stack of plates out of a cupboard. Overhead activities like pitching, throwing, playing tennis or playing racquet-ball commonly worsen symptoms. But not all rotator cuff tears are painful, and many individuals with rotator cuff injuries have no symptoms. How are rotator cuff injuries diagnosed? The diagnosis can come from: History and physical examination: This is the best way to initially evaluate. It is im-portant for the doctor to identify pain that may be coming from places other than the shoulder, such as the neck or even the heart. X-rays: Although plain x-rays do not show the rotator cuff muscles, they are helpful to look for calcifications, arthritis or bone problems that can cause rotator cuff tears. MRI: This is the most common imaging method to diagnose rotator cuff tears (Figure 2). It can be used to look for tears or inflammation of tissues and to help determine the size and character of the tear to recommend proper treatment. Injections or arthroscopy may also be used to help diagnose rotator cuff tears. Treatment Common treatment options may include: Alterations in activities: Learning to use the shoulder in a safer, more comfortable man-ner is important. Physical therapy: This may help improve mobility and strengthen shoulder muscles. Anti-inflammatory medications and injections: These are used for pain relief and to de-crease inflammation. If these treatments fail, surgical intervention (Figure 3) such as arthroscopy is a reasonable option. Large tears may require joint replacement surgery. Rehabilitation Postoperative treatment depends on which surgical procedure was chosen, but therapy is a critical part of the recovery. Therapy can last from three to 12 months. A coordinated effort between the patient, surgeon and physical or occupational therapist is required  
    Mar 25, 2017 48
  • 19 Mar 2017
    Peoria, AZ March 19.2017 There has not been a Russian player to arrive in Montreal and have a considerable impact on that tema since Alex Kovalev. I wonder what Rdulov's agaent had in mind when asking for an 8 year deal. It seems to me to be the wrong approach, particulary when it comes to the Montreal Canadiens. His agaent has to know that nop other teams wanted to take a chance on Radulov because of his past which has been well documented. In light of the fact that Montreal is ready to sign a 40 year old Russian defenseman that in my view has not played well in years and the fact that they still have Thomas Plekanec on the books it would seem that all you need do in Momtreal is play and keep your mouth shut and not give the appearance that you are putting yourself ahead of the team. We all know where the appearance of putting yourself ahead of the team got PK Subban. Alex if you want an eaight year deal, keep up the hard work, your point scoring and outsatnding play and keep your mouth shut and you'll see how easy it is to stay under contract in Montreal forever.
    88 Posted by Norman Peterson
  • Peoria, AZ March 19.2017 There has not been a Russian player to arrive in Montreal and have a considerable impact on that tema since Alex Kovalev. I wonder what Rdulov's agaent had in mind when asking for an 8 year deal. It seems to me to be the wrong approach, particulary when it comes to the Montreal Canadiens. His agaent has to know that nop other teams wanted to take a chance on Radulov because of his past which has been well documented. In light of the fact that Montreal is ready to sign a 40 year old Russian defenseman that in my view has not played well in years and the fact that they still have Thomas Plekanec on the books it would seem that all you need do in Momtreal is play and keep your mouth shut and not give the appearance that you are putting yourself ahead of the team. We all know where the appearance of putting yourself ahead of the team got PK Subban. Alex if you want an eaight year deal, keep up the hard work, your point scoring and outsatnding play and keep your mouth shut and you'll see how easy it is to stay under contract in Montreal forever.
    Mar 19, 2017 88